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Departments & Courses

Math & Computer Science

The Mathematics and Computer Science Department offers a diverse curriculum to accommodate a variety of student interests. You will find rigorous instruction in a supportive learning environment leading to a solid foundation in math and computer science. The faculty places an emphasis on a conceptual understanding, analytical skills, problem solving, application, and appropriate use of technology. Students who wish to specialize in Computer science can now pursue the Excellence in CS program.
  • CS101 CL Acc Computer Applications

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit).Computer applications is a course designed to provide basic knowledge of the computer and selected applications. The components of an information computer system are addressed. Through practice, students will gain experience in the use of microcomputers and programming packages in various applications such as word processing, electronic spreadsheets, graphics and database systems as a tool to solve common business problems.
  • CS111 CL Web Design & Develop

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). A project-based course that teaches digital communication skills in the context of the professional web design and development process using current industry software. Specific attention is paid to developing concepts and principles for thorough, effective design using industry standards. Students will develop static and dynamic web sites using HTML, CSS, jQuery, JavaScript, and PHP/MySQL. Students should have a good understanding of Windows and be able to access computer files across a network. The course is designed for students who are interested in designing and developing Internet content.
  • CS113 CL C++ through Game Design

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). An introduction to game algorithms and computer programming using the C++ language, todays industry standard. Students will develop core skills to begin programming with C++ specifically as it relates to games and user-interactivity, by being introduced to topics such as: basic C++ syntax, arithmetic operations, decision making using fuzzy logic, I/O, looping, arrays, generating random numbers, program modularization, and most importantly object-oriented programming. Students will gain hands-on experience by completing projects that design standard games, such as but not limited to Tic-Tac-Toe, Hang-Man, and Blackjack. Designed for students with some exposure to computers and who are interested in learning a programming language. 
  • CS133 CL Exploring Computer Science

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). Understanding the fundamentals of computer science is essential for almost any career one wants to pursue. This course will provide an overview of computer science and provide a basic framework for future classes. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and computational thinking. Topics will include computer organization, Internet and networking concepts, database concepts and an introduction to program design and development. The course stresses hands-on application of the concepts presented.
  • CS213 CL Data Structures

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course will involve an in-depth study of searching, sorting, and manipulation of data objects using algorithms of varying complexities. Students will be taught to measure the speed and efficiency of algorithms using mathematical tools such as the big-O analysis. The focus of this course will be on computer science theory and software engineering principles, including creation of data structures, modularization, data encapsulation, information hiding, data abstraction, analysis of algorithms, and as well as developing robust software design techniques. Students will also gain experience in applying data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues, and trees to game-design and game-programming using the Bloodshed Dev C++ IDE. Prerequisite: CS113 (A or B recommended or consent of instructor).
  • CS223 CL Database Design

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course is an introduction to the design, implementation, and management of database management systems. Topics include data modeling, normalization, relation algebra, Data Type Definitions (DTD), Structured Query Language (SQL), Data Manipulation Language (DML), Data Definition Language (DDL), and the utilization of a relational database management system to develop an integrated database application. Prerequisites: Completion of one programming course or the approval of the instructor.
  • CS244C CL Intro to Cybersecurity

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course introduces students to the basic and fundamental concepts of cyber security. The intention of the course is to provide students with an overview of the evolving and dynamic field of cybersecurity. Students will learn about the common cyber-attacks and the techniques for identifying, detecting and defending against cyber security threats. Other topics will include information assurance, social engineering, cryptography, and digital forensics. The course will also focus on providing students with a basic understanding of personal, physical, network, web and wireless security. Students should have a basic knowledge of computers and at least one semester of programming.
  • CS244D CL Data Analysis & Visualization

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). Data analysis and visualization is widely used in media, business, science, and engineering disciplines to help people analyze and understand the information at hand. The industry has grown exponentially over the last few years. As a result there are more visualization tools available, which have in turn lowered the barrier of entry for creating visualizations. This course will introduce students to basic visualization design and evaluation principles, and learn how to acquire, parse, and analyze large datasets. Students will be introduced to advanced Excel tools, JavaScript and Python libraries, and other tools for representing data. Students should have one semester of programming.
  • CS244J AP Prep Computer Science with Java

    One Semester (0.5 unit credit) The AP Prep CS with Java course introduces students to topics in Computer Science that include the design, implementation, and analysis of problems using the Java programming language. Students will be introduced to commonly used data structures, as well as searching and sorting algorithms using the Java libraries. This course emphasizes on object oriented techniques, writing solutions, running, testing, and debugging solutions in the Java programming language using the Eclipse IDE. This AP CS course is designed to help students master the fundamentals of the Java programming language and equip them with tools to successfully pass the College Board AP Computer A Exam at the end of the semester, should they wish to take it. This course will comprise of programming assignments, discussions in class, program demos in the lab, and tests. No prerequisites.
  • CS244V CL Intro Prog in Python

    CS244V Intro to Programming in Python (.5 credit)Students will be able to write simple graphic programs and games using OpenGL libraries. Python is a powerful language that does not have the complexity of C++ and Java.Python is used by many companies including Google and Industrial Light and Magic.
  • CS244W CL Object-Oriented Software Development

    One semester 0.5 unit course.This course discusses the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming. Techniques and programming strategies to solve problems in an object-oriented programming environment are taught. Emphasis will be placed on the study of UML modeling for Object-Oriented analysis and design. Also included are concepts of inheritance, polymorphism, cardinality, multiplicity, abstract classes, interfaces, relationship between objects, ATW and SWING libraries.
  • CS244X CL Intro to Software Engineering

    One semester 0.5 credit course.This course provides a formal background in the area of programming engineering, design, specifications and evaluation of high quality software. The course help students to build up and understand how to develop a software system from the beginning. Through the course, the students will learn the different stages of the development process and the fundamental principles of system development with object-oriented technology using UML. Software testing, unit testing, the testing of software releases, project management and professional software engineering practice will also be covered. Students are required to participate in a 3-4 group project. Prerequisite: One semester of programming and precalculus.
  • CS244Y CL Graph Algorithms

    Graph Algorithms - (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit).It will introduce time complexity and analysis of algorithms, data structures, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, and NP-completeness.Graph algorithms studied will include breadth-first and depth-first searches, strongly connected components, minimum spanning treesPrerequisite:Calculus 1, programming experience, or consent of the instructor.
  • CS244Z CL Robotics

    (unit of credit).Students assemble the Mindstorm NXT Robot in various configurations and program it to do specific tasks. Basic tasks include maneuvering the robot, following lines, gearing, making sounds and screen displays, and programming the distance, sound, and light sensors using loops, if-then statements, and arithmetic and logic comparisons. Students create designs and choose from an endless list of projects including etch-a-sketch, xerox, art, motion detector, drag racer, crane, guitar, Sumo wrestler, paper-scissor-hammer, catapult, worm, dinosaur, mousetrap, gymnastics, ballerina, and blue-tooth control. There are no prerequisites for the course. May be crosslisted with CS244Z CL Robotics
  • CS311 CL Programming in JAVA

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course will evolve rapidly from examining the basic syntax of the JAVA languagea programming language that is superior to other languages with regards to advanced special effects for dynamic we design and online game programming. Topics covered will include writing applets and applications to generate both basic and customized GUI components, mouse and keyboard event handling, animation with sound, graphics in JAVA using the 2D API, multithreading and thread-synchronization. Advanced topics will include introduction to 3D graphics and interactive game programming involving AI, Client-Server architecture and design. Prerequisite: CS 113 (A or B recommended) or consent of instructor. 
  • CS313 CL Mobile App Development

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course will involve a study of both iPhone and Android app development. Some of the topics will include leveraging developmental tools, using the Rails framework, storing, retrieving, and manipulating data, usage of iPhone and Android hardware devices, designing and building user-friendly apps. In addition, students will learn to develop network location apps and also publish them. Objective C and Ruby will be used to write iPhone Apps, and Java to develop Android Apps. Prerequisites: CS 113, CS 311, or consent of instructor.
  • MA100 CL Geometry (pt. 1)

    Fall semester (.5 unit): This course is for incoming students only, and serves two functions, to cover the topics in a traditional proof-based Euclidean geometry course, and to review Algebra skills to prepare students for LSMSA's rigorous courses in second-year algebra and trigonometry.  Geometry topics include direct and indirect proof, writing proofs in two-column and paragraph form, congruent and similar triangles and polygons, right triangles including an introduction to trigonometry, circles, areas and volumes, coordinate geometry, and transformations.
  • MA100 CL Geometry (pt. 2)

    Spring semester (.5 unit): This course is for incoming students only, and serves two functions, to cover the topics in a traditional proof-based Euclidean geometry course, and to review Algebra skills to prepare students for LSMSA's rigorous courses in second-year algebra and trigonometry.  Geometry topics include direct and indirect proof, writing proofs in two-column and paragraph form, congruent and similar triangles and polygons, right triangles including an introduction to trigonometry, circles, areas and volumes, coordinate geometry, and transformations.
  • MA120 CL College Algebra (pt. 1)

    Fall Semester (.5 unit): Students may not take MA 120 and MA 121. Topics include but are not limited to: Algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, linear systems, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, radical functions, rational functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions. 
  • MA120 CL College Algebra (pt. 2)

    Spring Semester (.5 unit): Students may not take MA 120 and MA 121. Topics include but are not limited to: Algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, linear systems, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, radical functions, rational functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.
  • MA121 CL Acc College Algebra

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). ACA covers most of the topics from MA 120, but in one semester. Students may not take MA 120 and MA 121. Students who take MA 100 Geometry at LSMSA will be advised as to whether to take MA 120 or MA 121. New students will be placed into the appropriate course based on previous classes and placement tests. Topics include but are not limited to: linear equations in one variable and their applications, the Cartesian coordinate system, slope, lines and their equations, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations, functions and their graphs, systems of linear equations, roots, radicals, and complex numbers, quadratic equations including completing the square and the quadratic formula. 
  • MA203 CL Trigonometry

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). May be taken concurrently with College Algebra second semester if A or B was earned in first semester. Trigonometry may be taken concurrently with Precalculus. Topics include a thorough treatment of the trig functions, including graphs, radian measure, unit circle, identities, trig equations, solving triangles, laws of sines and cosines, area, vectors, and applications. Additional topics may include polar coordinates, DeMoivre's theorem, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: Algebra II or College Algebra. 
  • MA223 CL Precalculus

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). Precalculus may be taken concurrently with Trigonometry. Topics include an intensive treatment of functions described as follows: general theory of functions; linear, quadratic, and general polynomial functions; solving polynomial equations; solving other types of equations; limit of a function; graphs of common functions and translations; inverse functions; theory of equations; and rational functions. Other topics include exponentials and logarithms, sequences, and series. Prerequisite: Algebra II or College Algebra. 
  • MA243 CL Probability & Statistics

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course is a study of the collection and tabulation of data, bar charts, graphs, sampling, measures of central tendency and variability, regression and correlation, statistical distributions, discrete and continuous probability/ distributions, hypothesis testing, and applications to various fields. Prerequisite: Algebra II, College Algebra or consent of Department Chair. 
  • MA244 CL Financial Literacy

    MA 244 CL Financial Literacy:  (One semester; 0.25 unit of credit).  A study of personal finance and money management. Topics include earning a living, saving for an emergency, investments, wealth building and credit card management among others. Students will develop skills and strategies that bolster financial responsibility and independence. Prerequisite: MA120 or MA121.  This course does not meet TOPS requirements.
  • MA250 CL Mathematical Modeling Simulation

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit)Modeling and Simulation are becoming essential tools in science and engineering alongside the traditional approaches of theory and experimentation. Simulation can investigate processes we cannot study in the lab because the process is too slow (geologic processes), too fast (atomic reactions), too dangerous (nuclear weapons), too expensive (aircraft wing design), too small (viruses), or too large (weather), or the experiment would be unethical (disease transmission). The course is be application-driven, with projects including predator-prey, disease transmission, antibiotic resistance, pendulums, ant movement, invasive species, and social networks. The course helps the student understand and exploit essential concepts of computational science, the modeling process, computer simulations, and scientific applications, covering five major approaches to computational science problems: System dynamics models, Empirical modeling, Cellular automaton simulations, Agent-based simulations, and Modeling with matrices.Most of the work in the course will be individual projects, with the level of mathematics and programming appropriate to the student's background; thus, students who have had only Algebra II (CA or ACA) and are comfortable with spreadsheets will be able to succeed in the course, and students with a stronger math and CS background will find projects that require all of their talents. Prerequisite: College Algebra or Acc. College Algebra, or Algebra II.
  • MA262 CL Discrete Math

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course examines various topics of discrete mathematics, that is, topics involving mathematics of countable sets. These topics include but are not limited to the following: social choice (fair division, election theory, apportionment), matrices as mathematical models (Leslie Model, Markov Chains), counting (fundamental principles of counting, combinations, permutations, partitions, binomial coefficients), probability, graph theory (Euler circuits and paths, Hamiltonian paths, trees, spanning trees, graph coloring), and recursion. Emphasis will be placed on applications of mathematics in "real life" problems. Thus, students will be expected to engage in mathematical exploration and experimentation. The use of the graphing calculator's probability, graphing, and matrix features as tools of problem solving will be stressed. Prerequisite: Algebra II or College Algebra, and consent of Department Chair. This is a senior-only course and is not recommended for students who have taken Calculus.
  • MA303 CL Calculus I

    One semester (unit of credit, four days a week). Topics include limit of a function, continuity, differentiation (including formal definition, derivative rules, implicit derivatives, derivatives of trig, curve sketching, max/min and related rate problems, introduction to integration, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite: Trigonometry and Precalculus (A or B recommended or consent of Department Chair). 
  • MA344 CL Mathematics of Finance

    MA344 CL Mathematics of Finance: (One semester; 0.25 unit of credit).  An introduction to mathematics techniques used in the finance industry. Topics include fundamentals of finance, the concept of Time Value of Money (TVM), and Portfolio Theory. While no background in finance is assumed, exposure to calculus will make the content more accessible to students. Prerequisite: current enrollment or completion of MA303 - Calculus 1.
  • MA403 CL Calculus II

    One semester (unit of credit, four days a week). Topics include indefinite integrals, definite integrals and the fundamental theorem, area under a curve, area between curves, volumes by disks, washers, and shells, length of a plane curve, surface area, average value of a function, numerical techniques, L'Hopital's Rule, inverse trig functions,transcendental functions, techniques of integration, and improper integrals. Prerequisite: Calculus I (A or B recommended or consent of Department Chair).
  • MA421 CL Modern Algebra

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This is an introductory course in the study of group theory. Because the subject is theoretical mathematics, emphasis will be placed on logic and proof. After a review of logic and set theory, the following topics will be explored: Properties of the integers, groups, semigroups, subgroups, Zn, nZ, product groups, Abelian groups, cyclic groups, finite permutation groups, LaGranges Theorem, homeomorphisms, isomorphism, normal subgroups, and Cayleys Theorem. Emphasis will also be placed on students learning to read and comprehend mathematical literature and to express mathematical ideas clearly. Prerequisite: Calculus I (A or B recommended or consent of coordinator).
  • MA422 CL Topology

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course is an introduction to point-set topology. After a review/introduction to logic, set theory, and proof, students will examine the set of Real Numbers in light of their usual topological structure to gain a deeper understanding of limits and continuity in calculus. Other topologies on R will be introduced and their corresponding effects on limit and continuity notions will be investigated by students. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to the following: axioms of Topology, open sets, closed sets, limit points, subspaces, finite product spaces, homeomorphisms, separation properties, compactness, connectedness, and metric spaces. Emphasis will also be placed on students learning to read and comprehend mathematical literature and to express mathematical ideas clearly. Prerequisite: Calculus I (A or B recommended or consent of Department Chair).
  • MA433 CL Advanced Statistics

    MA 444 CL Advanced Statistics -(One semester; 0.5 unit of credit).This course is an introduction to the mathematics of chance called probability. It begins withthe basic concepts and definitions and progresses through the mathematical foundations thatunderpin probability theory. The course will also encompass aspects of inferential statisticswhich are necessary for drawing conclusions from sampled data. A significant part of thecourse will deal with random variables and their distributions. Prerequisite: one semester of Calculus.
  • MA443 CL Linear Algebra

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course is a study of matrices, linear equations, dot products, cross products, geometrical proofs using vectors, determinants, n-dimensional space, vector spaces, subspaces, linear transformations, inner product spaces, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization, and applications. Prerequisite: Calculus I (A or B recommended or consent of Department Chair). (ULM dual enrollment option.)
  • MA461 CL Chaos Theory

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This is an introductory course to chaotic dynamical systems. It is an opportunity to introduce students to some contemporary ideas in mathematics. It can also serve as a connection between calculus courses and the more demanding real analysis courses by introducing abstraction. Topics covered include but are not limited to the following: history of dynamics, iteration, orbits, graphical analysis, fixed points, periodic points, bifurcations, chaos, symbolic dynamics, Sarkovskiis Theorem, the Schwarzian derivative, fractals, quadratic functions, complex functions, basins of attractions, Julia sets, and the Mandelbrot Set. The computer and graphing calculator will be used extensively. Prerequisite: Calculus I (A or B recommended or consent of Department Chair).
  • MA462 CL Graph Theory

    (One semester; 0.5unit of credit). This is an introductory course in graph theory. It will serve as an overview of the subjects main topics. The first half of the course shall consist of the basic definitions, proofs, and applications of graph theory. Topics include: subgraphs, isomorphic graphs, trees, circuits, cycles, and colorings of graphs. The remainder of the course will be spent on topics that may include, but are not limited to: labeling of graphs, drawings of graphs, graphs of surfaces, and applications and algorithms of graphs. Additional topics may include networking problems and their applications. (Offered alternate years). Prerequisite: MA303 (Grade of A or B recommended or approval of Department Chair).
  • MA503 CL Calculus III

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). This course is a study of polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, parametric equations, sequences, series, vectors, functions of several variables and their derivatives, and multiple integrals with applications. Prerequisite: Calculus II (A or B recommended or consent of Department Chair).
  • MA523 CL Differential Equations

    One semester (½ unit of credit). This course is a study of ordinary differential equations. Topics include: existence and uniqueness, first-order differential equations (separable variables, homogeneous equations, exact equations, linear equations, equations of Bernoulli and Riccati, substitution), applications of first-order differential equations (orthogonal trajectories, linear equations, nonlinear equations), linear differential equations of higher-order (initial and boundary value problems, linear dependence and independence, 2nd solution from known solution, homogeneous equations with constant coefficients, differential operators, variation of parameters, superposition and annihilator approach to undetermined coefficients), applications of second-order differential equations (simple harmonic motion, damped motion, forced motion), differential equation with variable coefficients (Cauchy-Euler equation, power series solutions, solutions about ordinary points). Prerequisite: Calculus II (A or B recommended).
  • MA533 CL Vector Calculus

    (One semester; 0.5 unit of credit). Course content includes: vectors (vector geometry, dot and cross product, equations for planes, distance problems, n-dimensional geometry, new coordinate systems), differentiation in several variables (functions, limits, the derivative, partial derivatives, the chain rule, directional derivatives, the gradient), vector-valued functions (parametrized curves, Keplers laws, arc length, differential geometry, vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, the Del operator), maxima and minima in several variables (differentials, Taylors theorem, extrema, Lagrange multipliers), multiple integrals (area, volume, double integrals, triple integrals, change of variables), and line integrals (scalar and vector line integrals, Greens theorem, conservative vector fields). Prerequisite: Calculus II (A or B recommended).

Department Faculty

  • Photo of David Andersen
    David Andersen
    Senior Lecturer of Mathematics and Computer Science, Department Chair
    318-357-2533
    Purdue University--Fort Wayne - Master of Science
  • Photo of Brad Burkman
    Brad Burkman
    Senior Lecturer of Mathematics and Computer Science
    318-357-2541
    SUNY Buffalo - Master of Arts
  • Photo of Olaseni Fadipe
    Olaseni Fadipe
    Associate Lecturer of Mathematics
    318-357-2549
    Central Michigan University - Doctor of Philosophy
  • Photo of Randy Key
    Randy Key
    Associate Lecturer of Mathematics
    318-357-2531
    University of Louisiana - Master of Science
    University of Arkansas - Bachelor of Science
  • Photo of Edwin Perez
    Edwin Perez
    Associate Lecturer of Computer Science
    318-357-2547
    University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez P.R. - Master of Science
    EDP University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus - Master of Computer Information Systems
    University of Puerto Rico, Bayamon, P.R. - Bachelor of Computer Science
  • Photo of Sanjeetha Peters
    Sanjeetha Peters
    Senior Lecturer of Mathematics and Computer Science
    318-357-2565
    West Virginia University - Master of Science
    University of Madras - Master of Science

Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts

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